That's Mr. Trekker to you, bud!
bitterandcurt:

Let’s talk about Renee Montoya for a minute.
She’s a character that was created for the Batman animated universe and first appeared in Batman: The Animated Series in 1992. It’s traditionally the fate of characters created in expanded universes to just fade away once the piece ends, but Detective Montoya joined the relatively small list of characters (like Harley Quinn, Mas y Menos, X-23, and Phil Coulson) to make the tough jump from expanded universe to the original comics.
First, she started guest starring in Batman and other comics related to Gotham City before becoming a major character in Gotham Central, a comic series that focuses on the Gotham police department. In that series, she is outed as a lesbian in an attempt to discredit her. She gets disowned by her religious parents and eventually quits the force out of disdain for the corruption she sees.
Then she becomes a major character in yet another comic series, 52 where her sexuality is NOT erased, her interracial lesbian relationship is shown and furthers her own character development, and she befriends The Question, a prominent DC superhero. Eventually, he passes on the torch and moniker to her and she becomes The Question.
So there we have it. A queer woman of color became The Question after starting as a side character in a non-canon animated television show.
How fucking cool is that?

bitterandcurt:

Let’s talk about Renee Montoya for a minute.

She’s a character that was created for the Batman animated universe and first appeared in Batman: The Animated Series in 1992. It’s traditionally the fate of characters created in expanded universes to just fade away once the piece ends, but Detective Montoya joined the relatively small list of characters (like Harley Quinn, Mas y Menos, X-23, and Phil Coulson) to make the tough jump from expanded universe to the original comics.

First, she started guest starring in Batman and other comics related to Gotham City before becoming a major character in Gotham Central, a comic series that focuses on the Gotham police department. In that series, she is outed as a lesbian in an attempt to discredit her. She gets disowned by her religious parents and eventually quits the force out of disdain for the corruption she sees.

Then she becomes a major character in yet another comic series, 52 where her sexuality is NOT erased, her interracial lesbian relationship is shown and furthers her own character development, and she befriends The Question, a prominent DC superhero. Eventually, he passes on the torch and moniker to her and she becomes The Question.

So there we have it. A queer woman of color became The Question after starting as a side character in a non-canon animated television show.

How fucking cool is that?

tastefullyoffensive:

"Some good advice I found in a bathroom." -raym0ndv2

tastefullyoffensive:

"Some good advice I found in a bathroom." -raym0ndv2

The Maze Runner

The Maze Runner

He looks like he has anime eyes in this one.

He looks like he has anime eyes in this one.

Glistening green. Almost like secret dreams a bored ship captain might have.

Number One: Disengage. The top of that knoll should have been sheared off the first second.Dr. Boyce: Maybe it was. It’s what I tried to explain in the briefing room. Their power of illusion is so great, we can’t be sure of anything we do, anything we see.

Number One: Disengage. The top of that knoll should have been sheared off the first second.
Dr. Boyce: Maybe it was. It’s what I tried to explain in the briefing room. Their power of illusion is so great, we can’t be sure of anything we do, anything we see.